English

[POETCom] European research project on soil fertility launched

Stephen Hazelman stephenh at spc.int
Tue Feb 2 21:21:58 UTC 2016


This week POETCom is discussing with a team under the PACENet arm to look into specific research needs for the Pacific organic movement. This started with a discussion on research issues during the 2014 POETCom meeting in Nadi.
In the Pacific – there are great research into the organic issues happening in New Caledonia, Solomon Islands, Fiji and PNG.

More information on this later
Stephen
European research project on soil fertility launched
Under the leadership of the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL) the European research project "Fertility building in organic cropping systems" (FertilCrop) has commenced. Twenty institutions in 13 European countries will work together on this three-year project on sustainable cropping methods.
[http://www.organic-research.net/typo3temp/_processed_/csm_FertilCropLogo_d29c7d037b.gif]<http://www.organic-research.net/uploads/pics/FertilCropLogo.gif>
[http://www.organic-research.net/fileadmin/templates/css/images/icon_zoom.gif]
[http://www.organic-research.net/uploads/pics/winter-wheat-undersown-isara-david.jpg]<http://www.organic-research.net/uploads/pics/winter-wheat-undersown-isara-david.jpg>
[http://www.organic-research.net/fileadmin/templates/css/images/icon_zoom.gif]
Winter wheat undersown with red clover. Photo: Christophe David, ISARA
(19.03.2015)
Soil fertility is key in organic agriculture, a production system that refrains from the use of chemically-synthesized fertilizers and pesticides. Soil fertility on organic farms is primarily supported by organic fertilizers, reduced tillage, and proper use of green manure crops: soils become more stable and more humusrich, soil micro-organisms are more active and plant roots have better access to nutrients
Reduced tillage is as yet not very common in organic agriculture as many farmers are afraid the system might create intense weed pressure. Without regular ploughing, especially the persistent rhizomatous weeds such as thistles, couch grass and dock increase significantly. They are difficult to control in organic systems as the use of synthetic herbicides is not permitted.
Higher yields under reduced tillage cropping
Therefore, more research on reduced tillage cropping is called for. As part of the FertilCrop project, FiBL together with other European researchers and agricultural advisors is now carrying such development work forward. To this end a range of different crop rotations, fertilizer use practices and variations of soil cultivation will be tested on farms. The ambitious goals of this work include higher yields, greater soil fertility, improved soil structure and fewer weeds. Reduced soil tillage can also decrease energy use and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases from soils.
The FertilCrop project involves close cooperation of experts in the areas of weed control, soil physics and biology, plant nutrition, green manures, composting, climate change and modelling. Improved cropping methods, new techniques and decision-making aids will be developed for practitioners. "We expect the close cooperation between farmers and researchers to yield environmentally-friendly and, in particular, locally adapted cropping systems that combine science with practical expertise", explains Andreas Fliessbach, the project manager at FiBL.
The groundwork: TILMAN-ORG
The FertilCrop project builds on its predecessor TILMAN-ORG, which ran from 2012 to 2014, involving some of the same research partners. Both the research focus of the newly launched project and the approach it takes are unusual. Its focus is on interrelationships, such as between crop yields and weed growth or between good soil structure and high soil microbial activity. All the partners will draw on already existing field experiments. The abundant data will be fed into computer-based advisory and decision support models with a view to producing easy-to-apply tools for farmers. Participating farmers will learn to confidently assess soil fertility and use the computer-based decision support systems.
Partners in 13 European countries join forces in interdisciplinary work
Over the project’s three-year term, 20 research partners in 13 European countries will collate and evaluate data from 18 field trials and case studies. This will combine the expertise of advisors, farmers and researchers.
The FertilCrop project is financed jointly by national funding bodies. These are involved in CORE Organic Plus (Coordination of European Transnational Research in Organic Food and Farming Systems), an ERA-NET action. The European ERA-NET scheme is aimed at national and regional programme organisers and managers, such as research ministries and national research institutions. For Switzerland, the Swiss Federal Office for Agriculture (FOAG) is the lead institution.
Further information
Contacts

  *   Andreas Fliessbach<http://www.fibl.org/en/team/fliessbach-andreas-en.html> [http://www.organic-research.net/fileadmin/templates/css/organicresearch/images/icon_extern.gif] , FiBL Switzerland, FertilCrop Coordinator
  *   Helga Willer<http://www.fibl.org/en/team/willer-helga-en.html> [http://www.organic-research.net/fileadmin/templates/css/organicresearch/images/icon_extern.gif] ,


From: Stephen Hazelman
Sent: Wednesday, 3 February 2016 8:32 AM
To: 'Jessica Hutchings'; Jo Smith
Cc: Karen L. Mapusua; Takena Redfern; Francois JAPIOT; Gesche Krause; Charlotte; takena.redfern at gmail.com<mailto:takena.redfern at gmail.com>; KAGY Valérie; Logotonu Waqainabete
Subject: SOLMACC: Strategies for organic and low-input farming


SOLMACC: Strategies for organic and low-input farming
01.02.2016 by Editor (comments: 0)
[SOLMACC map of demonstration  farms]<http://organic-market.info/files/images/Landwirtschaft/SOLMACC_Karte.jpg>SOLMACC map of demonstration farms
SOLMACC <http://solmacc.eu/> - Organic Farmers Countering Climate Change is an EU-project that runs from 2013 to 2018. It is driven by five partner organisations from four countries -Sweden, Germany, Belgium and Italy – and is co-funded by the EU LIFE programme. Its ambition is to demonstrate that by applying optimised farming practices organic farming can be climate-friendly, is explained on the website.

Strategies for organic and low-input farming to mitigate and adapt to climate change (SOLMACC) is about demonstrating that farming can be climate-friendly by applying a combination of optimised organic farming practices to respond to climate change. Across Europe, 12 demonstration farms have been selected with farmers adjusting their agriculture techniques over the course of five years under close scientific monitoring and supervision.
According to the SOLMACC website modelling will allow for predictions about the long-term impact on soil, biodiversity and climate to be made with the project’s results used to develop transferable approaches for other farms, be they organic or conventional. The project responds to one of the most urgent environmental problems of our time – climate change. The effects of global warming are already making farming more challenging due to the increasing divergence of weather patterns and extreme climatic events.
The other side of the coin is that agriculture is currently responsible for about 10% of the total Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the EU. SOLMACC can contribute to proactively confronting these issues by applying a range of optimised farming practices to help make farms more resilient to the effects of climate change and at the same time protecting the environment from harmful greenhouse gases.

From: Jessica Hutchings [mailto:jessica.hutchings at nzcer.org.nz]
Sent: Wednesday, 27 January 2016 7:07 AM
To: Jo Smith
Cc: Karen L. Mapusua; Takena Redfern; Stephen Hazelman; Francois JAPIOT; Gesche Krause; Charlotte; takena.redfern at gmail.com<mailto:takena.redfern at gmail.com>; KAGY Valérie
Subject: Re: Pacific Food Matters - DRAFT Brief for meeting one

Kia ora ano koutou,

sorry just one more thing re: reimbursements, you will need to produce all receipts to be able to claim reimbursements. I will bring claim forms up to the meeting for you to complete.

Cheers
Jess

On 26 January 2016 at 13:12, Jo Smith <Jo.Smith at vuw.ac.nz<mailto:Jo.Smith at vuw.ac.nz>> wrote:
Kia ora koutou

Looking forward to meeting you all very soon. In preparation for our meeting I thought I would signal my role on the project a little more so that you are aware there will be some recording facilities set up to document our meetings. I am based in the Media Studies programme at Victoria University of Wellington, currently engaged on a project to do with how media technologies can advance the research agendas of Indigenous communities. I see my role on the Pacific Food Matters team as exploring how media can be used to enhance our key objectives as well as how media itself might become an emerging research thematic to do with the relationship between traditional knowledges and science. To this end, I hope to record aspects of our meetings as well as conduct brief one-on-one interviews with presenters to capture key concepts. I’ll be seeking your consent to record at the start of our meeting and can field any questions then or later in my presentation slot.

Ngā mihi

Jo
___________________________
Dr Jo Smith
Senior Lecturer, Media Studies Programme
School of English, Film, Theatre, and Media Studies/Te Kura Tānga Kōrero Ingarihi, Kiriata, Whakaari, Pāpāho
Victoria University of Wellington/Te Whare Wananga o te Upoko o te Ika a Maui
81 Fairlie Terrace
Room 204
Wellington/Te Whanganui-a-Tara
Aotearoa/New Zealand
+64 4 463 6801<tel:%2B64%204%20463%206801>
http://www.victoria.ac.nz/seftms/about/staff/jo-smith




From: "Karen L. Mapusua" <KarenM at spc.int<mailto:KarenM at spc.int>>
Date: Monday, 11 January 2016 7:05 pm
To: Jess <jessica.hutchings at nzcer.org.nz<mailto:jessica.hutchings at nzcer.org.nz>>, Takena Redfern <redfern.takena at gmail.com<mailto:redfern.takena at gmail.com>>
Cc: Stephen Hazelman <stephenh at spc.int<mailto:stephenh at spc.int>>, Francois JAPIOT <FJapiot at canc.nc<mailto:FJapiot at canc.nc>>, Gesche Krause <Gesche.Krause at awi.de<mailto:Gesche.Krause at awi.de>>, Jo Smith <jo.smith at vuw.ac.nz<mailto:jo.smith at vuw.ac.nz>>, >, Charlotte <charlotte at severne.co.nz<mailto:charlotte at severne.co.nz>>, "takena.redfern at gmail.com<mailto:takena.redfern at gmail.com>" <takena.redfern at gmail.com<mailto:takena.redfern at gmail.com>>, KAGY Valérie <kagy at iac.nc<mailto:kagy at iac.nc>>
Subject: Re: Pacific Food Matters - DRAFT Brief for meeting one

Interesting article all.
Best
Karen

Traditional diets can help fight modern illnesses - health experts
By The Guardian , 07 January 2016
[SAMOAN FOOD: Traditional food systems need to be documented so that policymakers know what is at stake by ruining an ecosystem.]<http://www.sobserver.ws/en/07_01_2016/local/951/Traditional-diets-can-help-fight-modern-illnesses---health-experts.htm>
SAMOAN FOOD: Traditional food systems need to be documented so that policymakers know what is at stake by ruining an ecosystem.
Unprecedented levels of chronic non-communicable diseases are prompting calls to revert to the diets of our ancestors to regain lost nutrients.
It is believed that such a shift would help to improve society’s relationship with the Earth and restore human and environmental health.
“The rise of the industrial model of agriculture has contributed greatly to people being disconnected from the food on their plates,” says Sarah Somian, a France-based nutritionist.
Many traditional and non-processed foods consumed by rural communities, such as millet and caribou, are nutrient-dense and offer healthy fatty acids, micronutrients and cleansing properties widely lacking in diets popular in high and middle-income countries, say experts.
Indigenous diets worldwide – from forest foods such as roots and tubers in regions of eastern India to coldwater fish, caribou and seals in northern Canada – are varied, suited to local environments, and can counter malnutrition and disease.
“For many tribal and indigenous peoples, their food systems are complex, self-sufficient and deliver a very broad-based, nutritionally diverse diet,” says Jo Woodman, a senior researcher and campaigner at Survival International, a UK-based indigenous advocacy organisation.
But the disruption of traditional lifestyles due to environmental degradation, and the introduction of processed foods, refined fats and oils, and simple carbohydrates, contributes to worsening health in indigenous populations, and a decline in the production of nutrient-rich foodstuffs that could benefit all communities.
“Traditional food systems need to be documented so that policymakers know what is at stake by ruining an ecosystem, not only for the indigenous peoples living there, but for everyone,” Harriet Kuhnlein, founding director of the Centre of Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment at McGill University, Canada.
For more details http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2014/feb/03/indigenous-diets-fight-modern-illnesses

From: Jessica Hutchings <jessica.hutchings at nzcer.org.nz<mailto:jessica.hutchings at nzcer.org.nz>>
Date: Friday, 18 December 2015 2:25 pm
To: Takena Redfern <redfern.takena at gmail.com<mailto:redfern.takena at gmail.com>>
Cc: Karen Mapusua <karenm at spc.int<mailto:karenm at spc.int>>, Stephen Hazelman <stephenh at spc.int<mailto:stephenh at spc.int>>, Francois JAPIOT <FJapiot at canc.nc<mailto:FJapiot at canc.nc>>, Gesche Krause <Gesche.Krause at awi.de<mailto:Gesche.Krause at awi.de>>, Jo Smith <jo.smith at vuw.ac.nz<mailto:jo.smith at vuw.ac.nz>>, Nicola Bright <nicola.bright at nzcer.org.nz<mailto:nicola.bright at nzcer.org.nz>>, Charlotte <charlotte at severne.co.nz<mailto:charlotte at severne.co.nz>>, "takena.redfern at gmail.com<mailto:takena.redfern at gmail.com>" <takena.redfern at gmail.com<mailto:takena.redfern at gmail.com>>, KAGY Valérie <kagy at iac.nc<mailto:kagy at iac.nc>>
Subject: Re: Pacific Food Matters - DRAFT Brief for meeting one

Kia ora all,

thank you all for your feedback. I am attaching our final working brief for our meeting in February. Please note that Nicola Bright from NZCER who was on our original proposal is now unable to p[participate in the project due to health reasons.
All of the travel and accommodation is now booked, so we are all set to meet up in February. Wishing you all a safe and happy holiday period and I look forward to connecting in the New Year.

Nga mihi
Jessica


On 18 December 2015 at 12:30, Takena Redfern <redfern.takena at gmail.com<mailto:redfern.takena at gmail.com>> wrote:
Dear Jessica,

This draft meeting brief looks totally perfect to me. No comments.

Thanks and wish everyone a happy christmas!

On 12/9/15, Takena Redfern <redfern.takena at gmail.com<mailto:redfern.takena at gmail.com>> wrote:
> Hi Karen,
>
> Many thanks for copying me in this email. I hope Jessica take note of
> my right email address to use in future correspondences.
>
> Anyway, it's good to know that our team is progressing for this
> Pacific Food matters proposal.
>
> I will look through this attachment and get back to you Jessica if I
> have further thoughts or insertions to this.
>
> Thanks and kind regards,
>
> Takena
>
> On 12/8/15, Karen L. Mapusua <KarenM at spc.int<mailto:KarenM at spc.int>> wrote:
>> HI Jessica,
>> Just copying back to Takena – her email address was incorrect which is
>> why
>> she hasn’t been responding.
>>
>> The physical address is SPC Nabua, Lotus building 1st floor, Pasifika
>> Conference Room.
>> Taxi drivers will know its above the Nabua Police Station.
>>
>> Will take a look at the agenda and get back to you soon.
>> Best Karen
>>
>> From: Jessica Hutchings [mailto:jessica.hutchings at nzcer.org.nz<mailto:jessica.hutchings at nzcer.org.nz>]
>> Sent: Wednesday, 9 December 2015 10:56 AM
>> To: Karen L. Mapusua; Stephen Hazelman; Francois JAPIOT; Gesche Krause;
>> Jo
>> Smith; Nicola Bright; Charlotte; takena.redfern at gmail.com<mailto:takena.redfern at gmail.com>; KAGY Valérie
>> Subject: Pacific Food Matters - DRAFT Brief for meeting one
>>
>> Kia ora koutou,
>>
>> attached is my first draft of a meeting brief for our first meeting in
>> February. I wanted to get this our before Xmas. It is in draft form and
>> if
>> you have any suggestions please send them through to me.
>> I am at work until the 24th of December and then on leave until the 18th
>> of
>> January. If you could get any comments to me by next week that would be
>> great. The agenda is very high level and is aimed at giving us a
>> structure
>> within which to hold our meeting.
>>
>> All travel is booked or in the process of being booked for our meeting.
>>
>> Karen can you please advise the physical address for the meeting, can you
>> also advise if there will be power point facilities for us to use when
>> giving presentations.
>>
>> I look forward to hearing from you all.
>>
>> Nga mihi
>> Jessica
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>> Dr Jessica Hutchings
>> Manager, Te W?hanga
>> NZ Council for Educational Research
>> PO Box 3237, Wellington 6140, Aotearoa
>> DDI (04) 802 1458, Fax (04) 3847933
>>
>> Do you really need to print this? Whakaaro atu ki a Papat??nuku r?ua ko
>> Ranginui!
>>
>> The information contained in this email is privileged and confidential
>> and
>> intended for the addressee only. If you are not the intended recipient,
>> please respect that confidentiality and do not disclose, copy or make use
>> of
>> its contents. If received in error, please delete and contact the sender
>> immediately. Thank you.
>>
>
>
> --
> Takena Redfern (Ms)
> Agriculture and Livestock Division
> Ministry of Environment, Lands, and Agricultural Development
> P.O.Box 267
> Bikenibeu, TARAWA
> Phone: 28108
>


--
Takena Redfern (Ms)
Agriculture and Livestock Division
Ministry of Environment, Lands, and Agricultural Development
P.O.Box 267
Bikenibeu, TARAWA
Phone: 28108



--


Dr Jessica Hutchings
Manager, Te W?hanga
NZ Council for Educational Research
PO Box 3237, Wellington 6140, Aotearoa
DDI (04) 802 1458, Fax (04) 3847933

Do you really need to print this? Whakaaro atu ki a Papat??nuku r?ua ko Ranginui!

The information contained in this email is privileged and confidential and intended for the addressee only. If you are not the intended recipient, please respect that confidentiality and do not disclose, copy or make use of its contents. If received in error, please delete and contact the sender immediately. Thank you.



--


Dr Jessica Hutchings
Manager, Te Wāhanga
NZ Council for Educational Research
PO Box 3237, Wellington 6140, Aotearoa
DDI (04) 802 1458, Fax (04) 3847933

Do you really need to print this? Whakaaro atu ki a Papatūānuku rāua ko Ranginui!

The information contained in this email is privileged and confidential and intended for the addressee only. If you are not the intended recipient, please respect that confidentiality and do not disclose, copy or make use of its contents. If received in error, please delete and contact the sender immediately. Thank you.
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